Who likes Yamaha..?

I did like the A3000 sampler and the RM1x as a pattern-based sequencer.

Oh, you were the one liking a Yamaha Sampler…

BTW i have a TX16W to let go. Technically perfect but obviously has seen a lot the world.

Hm. How much?

Frank, have you made a programmer for the U-1? I would love to have a bigger acoustic piano.

I indeed have made a programmer that addresses all the CCs, NRPNS, CVs and Gates for the U-1, heres a pic of it:

You could make a case for it too:

plexi_piano

@thijs
Say the Syntacheles Price from amazon.de (whatever that is) + shipping?

@piscione

Oh, thanks for the suggestion but then id feel like Udo Jürgens:

I too like their quirky Tenori-on a lot. And although Yamaha never really made anything awful, for the most part, much of it was fairly unremarkable and workman like. Hence not a lot from Yamaha reached “I gotta have it” status, unlike for example, a fair amount of Roland kit did.
On the subject of the Tenori-on though. I bought one of the (expensive originals, and it’s a bizarrely cool bit of kit. But i’ll confess to being a little irked by the iOS version which pretty much is just as good, and in some ways, actually better than the hardware originals. Built in sounds are kinda weak though. But as a sequencer it’s way out there)
It’s more inline with what you might have expected from a far smaller company, than the likes of Yamaha.

@Luap
You must be obviously a young fella… back then when the DX-7 came out you would have sold your CS-80, Prophet, Jupiter and one of your hands to get one… and your girl also. It was producing previously unheard sound at a price at the fraction of a PPG, Synclavier or Fairlight. It was the break thru for digital synthesis and set the tracks for the next 20+ years… we are now turning with all those upcoming analog gear to a point where we were as the DX-7 hit analog synthesis. The DX-7 and is descendants (DX-7II/TX812, SY-77,99/TG77 and the FS1R) are awful good sounding pieces of gear, equally useful today (a thing i can’t say of the the Roland D-50 or Korg M1). Only lacking an UI i could ever understand, sadly.

It’s not the UI you don’t understand it is the way it works.

A fully knobbed UI wouldn’t make sense on FM since there a different models like flow charts. So it’s not easy to translate into a knob based interface.

The way I think of FM is to think of it as using HFO, high frequency oscillators. The modulator is the HFO modulating the carrier very rapidly.

“unremarkable” ? You mean “unremarkable” like the CS, DX/TX, TG/SY series and the FS1R?
Are you serious?

I second the lacking UI thought. I own or have owned several Yamaha synths in the past (TX81Z, TX7, SY99, RY30, RM50, TQ5), mainly because to me they sound awesome. Some months ago I bought a CP-50 digital piano, only to find that its user interface is just as unintuitive as all the other Yamaha gear I have had (and it’s not FM, so there is no excuse…). Sounds good though.

Mirko

FM or not, the DX1 was certainly workable, but it sure did (and does!) cost a pretty penny. Too bad the more pedestrian FM offerings never got to that level of control and overview sans a computer editor or the Jellinghaus programmer…

@6581
I fully understand how the JX8-P works (as well as FM) but its just as unprogrammable as the DX - same kind of interface that turns me off. I second that a Knob/Parameter Interface doesn’t suit FM, but foil made buttons, a single data entry slider and a small display isnt the way to make FM accessible, either.

I really like the SY99 UI. And the keyboard action.I have seen a Roland PG-200 interfaced to a DX7, in Tokyo, like a poor man’s Jellinghaus.
They used to be advertised in Keyboard Magazine (Japan). I shall have a rummage as I can’t remember how much the interface was off the top of my head.
regards

PreenFM did a really good job for a UI for FM… I hope the PreenFM 2 will get a little more close to the warmth of the DX7.

Yep, the Preen interface is good. But you have to remember that Yamaha’s FM implementation is phase modulation, but the Preen is using the original FM process.

Sure, the DX range was more innovative and interesting. But ultimately, they still sound like tinitus via a ring modulator. Which isn’t to everyones tastes. Im old enough to remember the DX7 when they were new. I didn’t like particularly them then, and im not going to like them now just because they are old.
And I didn’t say everything Yamaha was unremarkable. Please read the post again. But lets face it, Few (I didn’t say none) Yamaha products got the cult following (and daft inflated pricing), that say, several Roland boxes achieved.

Getting back to the OP’s point, which was basically about their analog synths and why they (and their associated parts) have little interest or following today. Because they made hardly any that anyone gives a hoot about today. The CS 80 being one of the very few exceptions. When is the last time you saw anyone lusting over a CS-10? And even if you did, you’d find 10X the interest for a 101 or SH-09 etc instead.

i find those yamaha ‘FM’ synths extremely unremarkable. too bad they killed the analog industry with their cold 80ies sound and dump prices. how can those organs be perceived as warm sounding?
but… it seems like there must be quite a lot people finding something positive about yamaha, i don’t.
roland is a completely different thing, i would even buy 90ies++ roland gear and in fact have.