Vince Clark's studio

Watch this, if you want to die of envy :confused:

Now, are there any better ones, compared to this modest set-up?

Here’s a lot better version for the first few minutes

Yes, his studio is very cool. His website is well worth a look. Lots of stuff to see for gearheads www.vinceclarkemusic.com

Also have a search for picts of Trent Reznors studio. And Hans Zimmer. Both pretty intense looking places with lots of nice gadgets to play with…

Not to mention Klaus Schulze. Although he has minimised his set up.

I was laughing the other night when I was browsing vintage synth explorer and almost every synth had one of the users as Vince Clark. Lucky $%£*****!

Vince Clark does not own a Shruthi, though :frowning:

That’s his loss :slight_smile: I think he’s rather traditional though, he doesn’t do digital for the most part (computers excluded).

Why not send him one? :slight_smile:

Yet.

Never say never.

He’ll get the word eventually and then he’ll have to have… four. At least. And a Sidekick. And a MidiPal.

I do wonder if he’s overcome his aversion to MIDI. I can see his point about the timing jitter if you use MIDI how it was originally designed to be used, 1 port with a synth on each of the 16 channels.

But these days you can use a port for every synth.

“doesn’t do digital for the most part” … i think he had 6 CZ101s under atari falcon MIDI control for a good portion of the period bridging the end of yazoo / beginning of erasure. his new album with gore was also recorded entirely in logic and file shared across america from what ive read. thats about as digital as it gets. but yeah, hes a notorious curmudgeon regarding analog sounds and MIDI clock issues. it was a serious problem early in MIDIs development. jungle jim, the first drummer for DEVO was one of the guys to help develop MIDI - if you want to blame someone

His old studio in the UK was pretty impressive, too. It was set out in a circular room, as I remember, with BBC Micro computer(s) controlling all his analogue gear. Very nice.

Incidentally, the Electric Independence series of mini documentaries at Motherboard.tv is well worth a look, if you’re into synthporn (and who here isn’t?).

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Found a photo!

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He seems to have a LOT more stuff in his new studio, though.

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It was around 1990 or so that someone pointed out his sound had changed. He decided it was down to MIDI allowing him to do chords. The Roland MC4 he used before could only record one note at a time and so he didn’t use chords much. He also noticed that the timing of MIDI wasn’t as tight as CV.

For the Chorus album he went back to analog synths and sequencers. The BBC Micro was used as a way of easily editing the Roland MC recordings, they were then played back to the MC4 via the cassette port.

I think you mean Atari ST not the Falcon, that was released in the early 90s by which time he had gone back to analog.

I don’t see him using many, or indeed any digital hardware synths. But he certainly isn’t anti software synths. I know he’s into a lot of Native Instruments stuff, like Reaktor.

Well, he said about soft synths that they don’t sound as good as analog synths, but you can do lots of modulation that would require a mile of patch cables.

He does still have a few Casio CZs. I spotted some on the original Vince Clarke studio interview that was on Motherboard . Oddly, the full interview doesn’t seem to be there now- looks like they pulled it from the Motherboard site, for some reason. The YouTube link above was a clip from the full interview, but not the whole thing, I think. I was on the lookout for more recent digital synths last time I watched it, and do remember spotting a few, but can’t remember is there were others, apart form the Casios.

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