Module tester v2

But yeah it’s a very efficient and trusted tool, the most used piece of equipment in my lab. My unit is 7 years old, has been left powered on for entire week-ends (oops) and is still kicking – I just had to replace the encoder once.

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I love mine ! I keep trying to think of ways to improve it! But it’s hard - it’s so useful! I am currently laying out a smt version in eagle with a smaller display with the aim of adding a headphone amp and mult - looking to add 1v/oct as well… as well as try to look at software calibration of the dac to improve accuracy…

Just bought another dac, screen and mcu to try to breadboard adding the 1v/oct and play with the software. I’m still learning so would be keen to know if this is a bad idea (ie not possible with the hardware - I think it is doable… but could be very wrong about that!)

Do you mean getting a 1V/O input to play tones or calibrate a CV output? That would be hard with the 8-bit ADC built into the AVR. You’d better use an external ADC (say an MCP3202).

As for improving accuracy of the DAC output to really hit 1.000V and 3.000V, yes it’s possible in software, you have to dither the DAC output (at the cost of a loss of output sample rate).

The test fixtures for the recent digital modules (starting from Plaits) use a MCP4822 for the 1V and 3V calibration CVs. There are no trimmers, it’s only software calibration, and I use 4x dithering to get 2 extra bits of precision.

1v/oct to play tones… (I was sort of thinking about putting together a mini tester rack with a racked module tester, mult, headphone adapter, adding 1v/oct for notes, adding a trs midi connection). I was looking at your calibration code in other modules for ideas. Thanks a lot for the info…

The module tester was the first DIY eurorack related thing I built, from a PCB ordered from the old Mutable web shop. It has subsequently facilitated building countless DIY modules, perhaps the most useful thing I’ve DIY’d.

Did you have much electronics experience before tackling this? I’m slowly getting into diy and am curious about the difficulty of this build - looks like a lot of parts but I have no idea what to expect.

I did have some electronics experience - but, I would say that this project is pretty good for a starting project. The PCB is large (easier to work with than a tightly packed euro module), and all the parts are through-hole. I think the most difficult part of this project for a beginner wouldn’t be soldering the board, but sourcing the parts, and programming the microcontroller chip if you don’t get one preprogrammed (aka ‘pre flashed’). There are no rare pars per se, but sourcing parts is always a pain the first times through. Similiarly programming the microcontroller isn’t difficult, but has the potential to be frustrating the first time through without help. If you want, the parts annoyance can be solved by purchasing a ‘parts kit’ or sourcing from a Mouser BOM (assuming the parts on the BOM are in-stock or else you’ll have to do a bit more work to swap in equivalent parts). The chip annoyance can be solved by buying a chip pre-programmed. You’ll also probably want an enclosure, at the time I built mine I had access to a laser cutter and laser cut an acrylic case from the .EPS file in the Mutable Instruments GitHub (https://github.com/pichenettes/module_tester/tree/master/module_tester/hardware_design/enclosure). If you don’t have access to a laser cutter you could also send the file to an online laser cutting service.

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Thanks for the pointers! I’ll definitely be giving this a shot soon.

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Good to see the venerable Module Tester getting some love. My old v1 version is super-useful. It’s currently powering the two Westlicht Per|former modules I’ve been building, and I’ve used it to test every other module I’ve built for the last few years.

BTW I’ve built the board finally and it works as expected!

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What changed for v2 Emilie? Is it just an incremental improvements type update?

I’m planning to start playing with some basic circuit stuff again, this unit would be a good tool to have on the bench. I actually built two of the original boards, blew one up, and sold the other. I should have kept it :slight_smile:

Would really love a nice metal case for my v.1 Tester. I use it all the time when building modules, these days.

  • Protection resistors on outputs
  • Requires a DC adapter, not AC
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Has anyone found a source for v2 pcbs? I’ve checked Thonk, Modular Addict, Amazing Synth and Pusherman, and they all either have the previous version or don’t have it at all. There’s always the option of getting them custom made, but learning how to navigate that is a rabbit hole I’d like to avoid for now :slight_smile:.

Huh… I guess nobody really knows about this update. Frankly, it’s not really needed except for the fact that DC adapters are way easier to find.

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Or, to put it another way; the AC ones are Really hard to find :wink:

Problem with the BOM.

I was just about to plan to build a tester and I noticed that one of the items on the BOM is no longer available: http://erthenvar.com/store/jack35mmv The web site is shutting down (it says).

Also, when I tried to open the .brd and .sch files in Eagle (hoping to get a friend to make up a board for me) I get an error (see image). Does this make any difference?

Oh, also noticed that the schematic on the module tester page is still v1.
https://mutable-instruments.net/archive/module_tester/
That’s what confused me, since it talks of the 12VAC power supply.

Heyyyyy. The v2 is something i built for me. I don’t plan to support it, document it or make anything out of it. Don’t turn this into an extra burden.

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Makes perfectly good sense. If you’d mentioned it before, I missed that point. Sorry if that was the case. Hard to know if/when people want to know things or don’t want to be bothered with them. I can imagine you get badgered enough. Was just trying to help.

Still, a wonderful tool from the looks of it, and I appreciate your sharing as much as you have.