LFO Sequences, by Green Daruma

For a while now I have been really interested in the sequencing technique of using an LFO and a Sample and Hold to make a sequence. The basic technique is you send a clock signal to the sample and hold and a divided clock to the sync input of the LFO so that it resets after a number of steps. Of course you can quantize and transpose such a sequence and make the sequence more complex by using multiple LFOs and using euclidean gate patterns instead of clocks, but the idea is the same.

This collection of songs uses this technique as the seed for each song and then expands out from there with improvised accompaniment and rhythm. Often times done on the digitakt, where to be thematic I would sequence the LFO as a kind of inversion of the concept.

At any rate, I hope you enjoy the tunes and feel free to ask if you have any questions.

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LFO sequences are pretty nice – you can get some really rich arpeggios out of your LFO. The Batumi is great for this since you can self patch to get some interesting combined LFO’s. The Intellijel Quadra with expander is also nice for doing this… or Maths for that matter. With combined LFO’s it is fun to parameterize aspects of the sequences so you can basically dial in distinct parts of the track. I used this on this track https://youtu.be/DWvu29FdlZY (kind of long as I got carried away) for the main melody line (as well as the slower lines).

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i’ve been meaning to try this for a while… it could get really interesting using something like mystic circuits vert which is an A/D converter, spitting out odd rhythmic trilling triggers from CV or audio. i could get some pretty interesting things going on by throwing a switch in the mix and going between outputs of a dual lfo wavetable oscillator and feeding the s+h and vert for some interestingly timed sequences.

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