Converting Mutable Instruments boards from Eagle to Kicad

Hello Everyone!

I have been converting Mutable Instruments Eagle board files to Kicad. The process is pretty easy and I will publish everything on Github once I am complete. I am going to fabricate some boards from the new Kicad files as a test to see if they are good.

I am going to make a Shruthi and Shruthi XT with a couple of filter boards, and then probably make rings, stages, and elements.

But I am curious if anyone has already done this. If no one has done it I’ll make sure to do a more thorough job. Otherwise if the task has already been done I won’t worry about publishing a duplicate. :slight_smile:

I just started learning about synthesizers and I am in love with these products. I am so happy Emilie has made this all open source! I started my own electronics company on Kickstarter in 2013 but failed to manage it all myself, so I am very impressed with what she has done.

Thanks!

Taylor Alexander (they/them) from reboot.love

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This is a grand idea. I’m unaware of any existing attempt to do this, but you may try asking on the wiggler forum as well as here.

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Good tip, thank you!

Recently I built a Shruthi from scratch using my Kicad conversion files. It works great! So I am working on a How-To video for the kicad conversion process, and I will be releasing the open source files with the video soon. I will update when that is up but I did post some of my footage in a tweet here if anyone wants to see it:

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Don’t they have Edif anymore? :0)

I’m not aware of that. I’ve used this set of scripts. It seems there is no (other) easy way to do it.

I see. Edif is for netlists only. This github project does more, with less certainty. And a lot of caveats.

Fwiw, U used to do netlist conversion with emacs keyboard macros. You can recreate the PCB stack up by hand. It’s not a lot of work that can’t be hand entered again. Copying the layout of this size is manageable.

In my experience, it’s easier to do a design of this size by hand. Then you will know exactly what’s there. With conversions, you don’t know the tools, or the design, you can’t check the output with any certainty.

Unless there’s a foolproof way - personally, I would do it by hand. You’ll learn something from it as well. But that’s just me.

Interesting. As a check, I overlaid the gerber files generated by Eagle with the gerber files generated by Kicad with difference highlighting. That was very helpful. And then of course building them is a great test.

When you say “recreate the PCB stack up by hand” do you mean place all of the components and route the board? In the end my goal is a fully editable Kicad project.

Yeah. I have extensive reverse engineering background. So, I always go to to scratch myself.

But, if you had the gerbers, then, heck forget all that :0) all the physical design rules and stack up are taken into account there.

I should look at one of this hardware someday.

Interesting. Well it seems I am able to accurately convert the boards in a few minutes with this tool. I’d not want to re-lay them out as even with the design rules it would be a lot of work. In the future I plan to convert the eurorack modules to Kicad as well (actually I have already been doing this) and I will also fabricate them to test them. So I’ll have a whole synth setup of self-made stuff.

See, your itch is reverse engineering and mine is fabricating stuff! :slight_smile:

And Our itch is music!

But, you’re missing out on a lot of fun! :0)

I did a lot of ASIC design and fault tolerance system architecture too. It’s all fun.

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Oh I have my share of fun!